Our Faculty

More than 150 faculty members work within the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. They have a wide range of expertise, from monitoring and assessing health risks and opportunities in populations, to helping build health-supporting social environments through policy, advocacy, and programs. They are educators, advisors, researchers, practitioners and community leaders. They come from backgrounds in quantitative, behavioral, environmental and social sciences, policy and government, exercise and health sciences and anthropology, among many other areas. They all work in collaboration with each other and with community partners, and are especially focused on the training and education of future leaders and practitioners in the public health fields.

 

Programs

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

B

Bayesian Methods for Data Analysis

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The methods students learned in the biostatistical applied and theoretical sequences were based on the “frequentist” method of statistical reasoning, where probability is understood to be the long-run frequency of a ‘repeatable’ event, and statistics that are computed are based on a specific study only. Bayesian methods are based on a different philosophy – that probability of an event is based on ALL information known at the time. Bayesian methods for data analysis enable one to combine information from previous similar and independent studies (prior information), with information from a new study, yielding updated inference for model parameters. This course will cover the concept of Bayesian analysis, posterior distribution, Bayesian inference and prediction, prior determination, one parameter and two parameter models, Bayesian hierarchical models, Bayesian computation, model criticism and selection as well as basic comparison of Bayesian and Frequentist Inferences. Real life examples in medical and health science will be used to explain the concept and application of Bayesian models.

Prerequisites:

  1. BSTA 511/611 Estimation and Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics
  2. BSTA 612/613 Linear Models
  3. BSTA 550 Introduction to Probability

BIOST Thesis

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Advance permission from the Program Director.

Biostatistics Lab

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The course provides hands-on data analysis and/or biostatistical consulting experience to students outside classroom settings. Students will have opportunities to perform data analysis with inputs from faculty members.

Prerequisites:

  1. Students should have adequate skills in at least one statistical program among STATA, SAS or R
  2. BSTA 511/611 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics
  3. BSTA 512/612 Linear Models

C

Categorical Data Analysis

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This course covers topics in categorical data analysis such as cross tabulation statistics, statistics for matched samples, and methods to assess confounding and interaction via stratified tables. Students will learn logistic regression, and relate results back to those found with stratified analyses. Similar to linear regression in BSTA 512, topics for logistic regression will include parameter interpretation, statistical adjustment, variable selection techniques and model fit assessment. Students will have the opportunity to briefly explore other analysis methods, such as Poisson regression, ordinal logistic regression, etc. Most homework assignments for this course are to be completed using statistical software.

Prerequisites:

  1. BSTA 511/611 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics
  2. BSTA 512/612 Linear Models

**Note: This course is offered at OHSU, and is cross-listed at PSU as STAT 577. PSU students who wish to take this course must submit an intercampus registration form.

Chronic Disease Epidemiology

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This course is designed for MPH Epidemiology and Biostatistics majors. The course is intended to give students a good understanding of the epidemiology of the major chronic diseases in developed countries. It covers three aspects of chronic disease: 1) epidemiology methods used in their study, 2) epidemiologic findings and current status of epidemiologic research into various chronic diseases, and 3) the epidemiology of the major risk factors for chronic diseases. The course is based on presentations by researchers and public health practitioners expert on specific chronic disease topics. Students will gain familiarity with some of the classic epidemiologic studies and with some of the innovations to obtaining knowledge contributed by epidemiology.

Prerequisite: CPH 541/PHE 530/PHPM 512 Epidemiology I

Communicable-Chronic Diseases

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Reviews etiology, epidemiology, and approaches to prevention of infectious and chronic diseases. Aspects of risk factors, transmission, pathogenesis, immunology, case management, and control programs are discussed. Basic human physiological processes are reviewed.

Recommended prerequisites: Bi 301, 302, PHE 250.

Level: Undergraduate

Communication and Informatics

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This course will examine methods to summarize and synthesize data pertinent to primary health care and health disparities, to analyze and track trends in that data and then to communicate that data to relevant audiences. Current trends will be described and discussed to examine health indicators among the US population. Emphasis will be placed on techniques for retrieving, organizing and displaying relevant data to track health disparities in US populations. Principles of communicating scientific data to lay audiences will be covered. Database and mapping applications for tracking trends in served populations will be introduced. Database manipulation will be explored by composing and executing query statements and critically evaluating the results.

Prerequisites: None

Community Based Participatory Research

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This course examines Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) as a research paradigm to understand and address health disparities at the community level. Review of operating principles includes the central place that communities are accorded as units of identity and as co-equals in research, a process that is perceived by community constituents as not dominated by elitists, an emphasis on long-term commitment by all partners, emphasis on co-learning so that the process flows back and forth, use of exercises that stimulate collective visioning among all partners, incorporation of social ecology approaches as departures for research and practice; use of innovative problem solving approaches; use of multiple methods of data collection. Topics include community theory, development strategies, promising interventions, group development techniques, community diagnosis and capacity assessments.

Prerequisites: None

Community Health

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This course will meet weekly during the Fall quarter in a presentation-discussion style format. It will introduce students to community resources for addressing a range of health problems that are encountered in both clinical and a public health settings. Students will also be introduced to ways of identifying and accessing those services in their own work.

Prerequisites: Current graduate standing or instructor approval.

Community Health Principles & Practices

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Provides an overview of the scope of problems in the field of community health. Examines disease prevention/control, community health service delivery, the structure of official/unofficial agencies, and policy/decision-making processes. Course includes field work in a community health agency.

Level: Undergraduate

Concepts of Environmental Health

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This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic concepts and issues in environmental and occupational health. Environmental and occupational hazards that affect human health are examined in the context of current social, political and regulatory pressures. Topics include environmental and emerging disease, environmental toxicology, risk assessment, occupational health, food protection, drinking water safety and waste water treatment, solid and hazardous waste disposal, indoor and outdoor air pollution, radiation and pests and pesticides. Global environmental health issues are included as time permits.

Prerequisites: None

Note: The on campus section of this course is listed under PHE 580 or PHPM 518.

Concepts of Environmental Health

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This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic concepts and issues in environmental and occupational health. Environmental and occupational hazards that affect human health are examined in the context of current social, political and regulatory pressures. Topics include environmental and emerging disease, environmental toxicology, risk assessment, occupational health, food protection, drinking water safety and waste water treatment, solid and hazardous waste disposal, indoor and outdoor air pollution, radiation and pests and pesticides. Global environmental health issues are included as time permits.

Note: Additional sections of this course are listed under CPH 539/639 and PHPM 518.

Prerequisites: None

Level: Graduate

Concepts of Environmental Health – Summer

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This course is designed to introduce graduate students in the MPH degree programs of the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health to the fundamental concepts of theory and practice in environmental public health. Students will become familiar with principles of hazard identification, exposure assessment, toxicology, epidemiology, intervention, and policy and regulation. Application of concepts will be illustrated in a wide variety of agents and diseases, ranging from toxic air pollutants, pesticides, noise and ionizing radiation, to the emerging issues of endocrine disruptors, climate change, and the built environment.

Note: Additional sections of this course are listed under CPH 539/639 and PHE 580.

Consumer Health Issues

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Identifies and critically analyzes issues related to the production, marketing, and consumption of health-related goods and services. Media messages about consumer health issues are examined; topical and timely research is analyzed.

Level: Undergraduate

Current Issues in Public Health

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The purpose of this course is to analyze current and controversial issues in public health. The course provides an opportunity to discuss, analyze, make recommendations for and examine policy outcomes of issues, practices and current and historically controversial public health events.

Prerequisites: None

Current Issues in Public Health

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This course is designed to introduce students to public health in a seminar-style (presentation-discussion) exploration of the basic principles, structures, and functions of public health, and selected important issues in the public health community. This will involve inviting public health and preventive medicine professionals from OHSU, PSU, and the community to present, and facilitate discussion of, their perspectives and current work related to these public health topics and issues.

D

Data Management & Analysis in SAS

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This course is designed for students who want to develop and expand their skills in data management, statistical analyses and graphics for the real world applications using SAS. After brief introduction, the course will cover intermediate to early advanced level programming skills in SAS. The class will be taught in a computer lab in order to give the student hand on experience using SAS to manage data, perform analyses and produce graphs. Class sessions and homework will be oriented around particular data management and analysis tasks. Health-related data sets will be provided for students to use. This course could be extremely helpful in preparation for thesis, capstone or other research projects.

Prerequisites:

  1. BSTA 511/611 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics
  2. BSTA 512/612 Linear Models

Design and Analysis of Surveys

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This course is designed to introduce basic concepts, techniques, and current practice of sample survey design and analysis with emphasis on community health surveys. Specific topics covered include introduction to instrument design and evaluation, and statistical sample design (including simple random sampling, systematic sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, multistage sampling, and replicated sampling). Examples of complex designs will be drawn from telephone surveys, the Current Population Survey and various health surveys of National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Topics in estimation and analysis include probability weighting, weight adjustments based on auxiliary data, ratio and regression estimators, and methods for estimating variance from complex surveys. Analysis of complex data will be illustrated using STATA 13 and R and taking examples from complex surveys of NCHS.

Prerequisite: BSTA 511/611 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics

Meet our Faculty

David Bangsberg

Founding Dean

Dr. Ryan Petteway – A People’s Social Epidemiologist

Assistant Professor
Office: PSU – URBN 470N