Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) and Portland State University (PSU) School of Public Health

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Our Faculty

More than 150 faculty members work within the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. They have a wide range of expertise, from monitoring and assessing health risks and opportunities in populations, to helping build health-supporting social environments through policy, advocacy, and programs. They are educators, advisors, researchers, practitioners and community leaders. They come from backgrounds in quantitative, behavioral, environmental and social sciences, policy and government, exercise and health sciences and anthropology, among many other areas. They all work in collaboration with each other and with community partners, and are especially focused on the training and education of future leaders and practitioners in the public health fields.

 

Programs

Home » Courses by Program » Public Health & Preventive Medicine
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Chronic Disease Epidemiology – EPI 576

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Biography

This course is designed for MPH Epidemiology and Biostatistics majors. The course is intended to give students a good understanding of the epidemiology of the major chronic diseases in developed countries. It covers three aspects of chronic disease: 1) epidemiology methods used in their study, 2) epidemiologic findings and current status of epidemiologic research into various chronic diseases, and 3) the epidemiology of the major risk factors for chronic diseases. The course is based on presentations by researchers and public health practitioners expert on specific chronic disease topics. Students will gain familiarity with some of the classic epidemiologic studies and with some of the innovations to obtaining knowledge contributed by epidemiology.

Community Health – EPI 507

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Biography

This course will meet weekly during the Fall quarter in a presentation-discussion style format. It will introduce students to community resources for addressing a range of health problems that are encountered in both clinical and a public health settings. Students will also be introduced to ways of identifying and accessing those services in their own work.

Current Issues in Public Health – EPI 566

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Biography

This course is designed to introduce students to public health in a seminar-style (presentation-discussion) exploration of the basic principles, structures, and functions of public health, and selected important issues in the public health community. This will involve inviting public health and preventive medicine professionals from OHSU, PSU, and the community to present, and facilitate discussion of, their perspectives and current work related to these public health topics and issues.

E

Epi Journal Club – EPI 630

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Biography

This is an elective course for epidemiology track masters students. Doctoral students are required to register for at least two terms (one credit each) during the first two years of their program. This course is intended to extend students’ understanding of the field of epidemiology and public health research, and their ability to explore and critique research methods with an emphasis on very current epidemiologic peer-reviewed papers. In weekly sessions, the instructor, guest faculty, and students, will prepare one peer-reviewed article for class discussion that demonstrates or involves innovative public health content or methods. A secondary goal of this class is to prepare students to perform peer-review themselves (e.g., for journals, study sections) using examples of this work from faculty.

Grade mode: Pass / No Pass.

EpiData Analysis & Interpretation – EPI 536 / 636

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Biography

Students will apply epidemiologic and biostatistical principles to the analysis of a public health dataset. Hypotheses are formulated based on datasets provided to the class and a brief literature review of the public health need for the research. Students work in small groups to plan, organize, and conduct analyses leading to final oral and written presentations of their findings. Class time held in the computer lab allows for hands-on experience with data quality assessment, preparation of datasets and variables for analysis, and multivariable modeling. Emphasis is on planning and communicating analytic plans that reflect the causal models generated by students and allow for assessment of confounding and interaction.

Prerequisites:

  1. EPI 512 Epidemiology I
  2. EPI 513/613 Epidemiology II: Methods
  3. EPI 514/614 Epidemiology III: Causation
  4. BSTA 511/611 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics
  5. BSTA 512/612 Linear Models
  6. BSTA 513/613 Categorical Data Analysis
  7. For those taking EPI 636, the additional prerequisite is BSTA 515 Data Management & Analysis in SAS.

Epidemiology II: Methods – EPI 513/613

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Biography

This course is the second in a three course sequence designed for the MPH in Epidemiology and MPH in Biostatistics majors. Students will develop skills in recognizing strengths and weaknesses of various epidemiologic study designs; describing sources of bias that can distort measures of effect/association; and designing case-control studies, cohort studies, and randomized clinical trials. The class will also explore additional study designs used less frequently, such as nested case-control studies and case-crossover studies. Students will gain experience in recognizing and evaluating the role of confounding in data derived from epidemiologic studies. Additional tutorial sessions, to be scheduled at a time convenient for the students, will include problem-solving exercises focused on study design and analysis. Written homework assignments and problem-oriented learning will occupy a central role in facilitating mastery of epidemiologic methods and issues.

Prerequisites:

  1. EPI 512/612 Epidemiology I
  2. BSTA 511/611 Estimation and Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics

Epidemiology III: Causation – EPI 514 / 614

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Biography

This is the third course in the epidemiology research methods series and is designed to develop your ability to apply your knowledge and skills to the evaluation of cause. Students will become familiar with epidemiologic concepts of disease causation, develop skills in assessing the epidemiologic literature to arrive at causal conclusions, and learn to use those assessments and conclusions to arrive at justifiable plans for action. Early in the academic quarter, lecture presentations and readings will provide the key epidemiologic concepts and principles involved in making judgments about causation. Discussions in Small Groups will focus on seminal journal articles to reinforce students’ understanding of these concepts. Case studies will also be covered in Small Groups, in which students will review and discuss sets of papers on public health topics that require a rigorous assessment of cause. For each of these topics, students will complete formal written papers (assessments) and participate in discussions using an evaluation framework developed for this course. This framework involves assessing the quality and validity of the epidemiologic evidence to support causation and recommending a course of action to protect public health. Students will share the responsibility of leading the Small Groups, and will be assigned a week to lead the class discussion.

Prerequisites:

  1. EPI 512/612 Epidemiology I
  2. EPI 513/613 Epidemiology II: Methods
  3. BSTA 511/611 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing for Applied Biostatistics
  4. BSTA 612/612 Linear Models

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Global Health Epidemiology – EPI 567

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Biography

This course challenges students to apply epidemiological principles to address problems and diseases found in lower income nations and among displaced persons in the context of a matrix of social, political, economic, resource-poor, and ethical “environments.” Instructor will provide necessary background regarding health issues to stimulate discussion and analysis aimed at preventing or mitigating complex impediments to health.

Prerequisites:

  1. BSTA 511/611 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing -or- BSTA 525 Introduction to Biostatistics
  2. EPI 512 Epidemiology I

H

HIV/AIDS Epidemiology – EPI 556

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Biography

The course will start with a review of the known characteristics and pathology of the human immunodeficiency virus infection and the pathogenesis of the clinical acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Biological and behavioral factors that determine the risks of transmission of the HIV infection will be emphasized and public health prevention strategies will be evaluated. The global HIV epidemic will be considered along with the impact of HIV infection on vulnerable populations, especially women and children. Ethical factors and the impact of stigma will be discussed.

Prerequisite: EPI 512, “Epidemiology I”

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Infectious Disease Epidemiology – EPI 568

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This course provides students with an opportunity to apply epidemiologic principles to infectious disease, including implementation of control measures based on epidemiologic investigation. It includes a didactic section on specific infectious diseases, followed by a classroom study of both endemic and epidemic outbreaks. There will be in-class exercises on each of the infectious diseases, including the testing of hypotheses based on epidemiologic findings leading to a discussion of control measures.

Prerequisite: EPI 512, “Epidemiology I”

Introduction to Research Design – EPI 540

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Biography

This course provides an introduction to research design and proposal writing. It builds upon concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics to enable students to develop a study plan to conduct public health research that is efficient, effective, and ethical. Writing a research proposal is a skill necessary in the professional practice of public health. During this course, students will prepare a written proposal that includes a concise statement of the research question, testable hypotheses, appropriate specific aims, and a plan of work. Students will learn how to formulate a logical argument to establish the significance of their question and to defend their approach. All of the elements of the study plan will be developed, including choice of design, sample size and power, sampling design and recruitment of subjects, measurement of predictor and outcome variables, control of bias and confounding, and statistical analysis. Limited time will be spent on an introduction to budget development and project management. The major product of the course is the completion of a research proposal, which will be prepared according to the submission requirements of a federal funding agency.

Prerequisite: EPI 512, “Epidemiology I”

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Medicine & Public Health Seminar – EPI 507

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This course will involve a series of public health/epidemiology seminar sessions with a presentation-discussions format focused on issues of interest to both clinicians and public health practitioners, particularly those relevant to the interface between medicine and public health.

 

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PhD Epidemiology Methods Seminar – EPI 610

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This advanced doctoral-level course synthesizes across students’ prior training in epidemiology, biostatistics, applied research, and the disciplines/content areas that are required for students’ doctoral research. Building on this foundation, and drawing from doctoral students’ and the instructor’s expertise, this course aims to facilitate the intellectual development required to conduct and present original epidemiologic research.

Q

Qualitative Research Design – PHE 520

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Presents the philosophical and theoretical bases supporting the development of alternate research paradigms in human inquiry. Essential characteristics of three major alternate paradigms (interpretivist, constructivist, and critical theory) are introduced. Validity, reliability, and related concepts are examined from the perspective of each paradigm. Alternate strategies for inquiry are presented and ethical considerations related to qualitative forms of inquiry are addressed.

Meet our Faculty

David Bangsberg

Founding Dean

Dr. Ryan Petteway – A People’s Social Epidemiologist

Assistant Professor
Office: PSU – URBN 470N